Tag Archives: Tahbilk

On the Twenty-third day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Tahbilk Old Vines Cabernet Shiraz

Time to look back at last Christmas in the Christmas advent wine calendar.

I’d purchased this wine during the year in 2015 in preparation for a special occasion, which turned out to be Christmas of 2015.

 

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It was the Tahbilk old vines Cabernet Shiraz 2012. This is the second Tahbilk wine in the advent wine calendar – number 8 was the grand tawny.

The old vines Cabernet Shiraz comes from Tahbilk’s oldest vines in the vineyard dating back to the 1860’s.
These old vines are what gives the wine it’s roundness and flavour.

Earning 96 points from James Halliday, here’s what the great man had to say about the wine:
“As one might expect, the colour, the bouquet and the palate all attest to the youth of the wine, yet it has all the hallmarks of the old vines: blackcurrant, blackberry and cherry fruit are the drivers of the bouquet and palate alike, French and American oak totally integrated: the most remarkable aspect is the fine, supple tannins making it a classic two-way proposition.”

It’s a great wine to have at the Christmas table. I wonder what this year will bring?! Stay tuned!!

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I wonder what wine will feature at the Christmas table this year?!

Until next time winos,

Cheers

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On the thirteenth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Frosé

Melbourne is hot hot hot today!
35 degrees : 95 Fahrenheit

To cool off in the summer sun, a Frosé is the perfect way to do it! As the name suggests, it’s a frozen Rosé

It was invented by Bar Primi in New York City. This really is the best thing since sliced bread. What will humans do next?!

How to make it

1. Take a bottle of Rosé and pour in to a tray. Freeze overnight (about 8 hours).
It won’t completely freeze, but will be like a slushie.

I’d recommend going for a darker Rosé. This will make the flavours of the Rosé really come through in the slushie mixture.

My picks –
Tahbilk Cabernet Rosé made from Cabernet Sauvignon
Crittenden Estate’s Pinocchio Rosato made from Sangiovese grapes
6Ft6 Pinot Noir Rosé

In fact, 6Ft6 are straight on the band wagon and you can even order a Frosé pack  to make at home! Check it out here!

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Credit @6Ft6wine

2. While the Rosé is doing its work, time to get on to the strawberry sugar syrup.

Bring 1/2 a cup of water and 1/2 a cup of sugar to the boil. Once the sugar dissolves take it off the heat and pop 220grams of strawberries (almost a punnet) into the pot. Mix, and let the mixture sit for 30 minutes for the strawberries to infuse. Press the mixture through a sieve.

Make sure the sugar syrup is cool before proceeding to the next step.

3. In a blender, scrape the frozen Rosé into the jug, along with approx 100g of the sugar syrup, a squeeze of lemon juice, and 1 cup of crushed ice.

4. Blend blend blend

5. Pop the mixture back in the freezer for 30 minutes

6. Once chilled, pop the mixture back in to the blender and buzz it up again. This will make the icy mixture smoother.

At this stage, if you’re feeling a little frisky, you can even pop in a dash of vodka. (Did she just say that?!)

7. Serve in cocktail glasses and enjoy
Until next time winos

Cheers

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On the eighth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Tahbilk Grand Tawny

To settle you in to Thursday evening, and prepare you for Friyay, a cheeky Tawny after dinner is a great choice!

I’ve featured this wine on my blog before – ‘hop yourself to nagambie over the Easter long weekend for some great wine’ It’s so good that it deserves a place in the advent wine calendar – It’s the Tahbilk Grand Tawny.
From one of Australia’s oldest wineries, founded in 1860, this port delivers all the deliciousness and stickiness that you look for in a port.

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The historic buildings at Tahbilk Winery

Pour yourself a glass of this, and it will feel like you’re sipping on Christmas cake. What better wine to get you excited and geared up for the day the man in the big red suit arrives!

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The other beauty is that it comes in a 750ml bottle, which means it will keep providing you with little glasses of joy for a while. Generally, when you do open one a bottle of port, consumption should happen in 3 months for it to be at its optimum level, which is plenty of time to savor and enjoy it.

“This impressive fortified has had extended ageing in seasoned oak barrels and shows classic tawny colour. The nose exhibits distinguished aromas of walnut and prune with a complex mix of dried fruits. The palate is deeply flavoured and concentrated with characteristic caramel, toffee, walnut and fruitcake flavours, whilst the finish is long and lingers well into an evening of quiet contemplation!” www.tahbilk.com.au

Until next time winos

Cheers

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Hop yourself to Nagambie over the Easter long weekend for some great wine!

The Easter long weekend is approaching! If you haven’t planned what you’re going to do, here’s one suggestion – a trip up to the Nagambie wine region. I did this little round trip last Easter, and only takes an afternoon. Being autumn, it’s the perfect time of the year to taste and stock up on some great reds, ports and fortified’s in preparation for winter.

 

First stop – Mitchelton Winery

Welcome

Welcome

This winery is about an hour and a half’s drive from Melbourne up the Hume Highway. Driving up the driveway, you will instantly notice the ‘legendary tower’ peaking up above the winery. This tower was designed by architect Ted Ashton in 1974, and has a great lookout at the top across the vineyard. Don’t worry there is a lift up to the top, which is very handy after you’ve completed your wine tastings.

The legendary tower!

The legendary tower!

View from the top

View from the top

 

With a variety of wine on offer, and at many different price points, you will be sure to find a wine that suits you.

 

Tip the Bottle’s top picks:

 

2012 Mitchelton Marsanne

2010 Heathcote Shiraz

2012 Mitchelton Shiraz

2012 The Blend – Cabernet Merlot

 

Got me some wine!

Got me some wine!

Winery lyf

Winery lyf

 

Second stop – Tahbilk

If you ever want to go to a historic vineyard, this is the one to go to. Established back in 1860, the vineyard was taken over by the Pulbrick family in 1925, and has been in the family ever since.

Historic buildings

Historic buildings

On arrival, when driving up the driveway, one of the first things you will see is the old vineyard. It’s enough to get your taste buds excited. Once you hop out of the car, take your time to wander throughout the cellar door, and take in all of the history on offer. See the many bottles of Marsanne dating back years (I can’t remember how many exactly, but there was a lot), and the change in colour as it has aged. Wander down below the tasting area to the old underground cellar and see barrels as old as 100 years!

 

Even Prince Phillip has visited Tabhilk!

Even Prince Philip has visited Tabhilk!

So much wine to taste!

So much wine to taste!

YES!!

YES!!

Once you’ve worked your way through your tastings, wander over to the café, take a seat and relax beside the billabong. I recommend the meat and cheese platter, along with your favourite glass of Tahbilk wine. I can guarantee you will find yourself saying ‘ahh..this is the life’.

 

While you’re there, sign yourself up to their wine club and get yourself some great discounts.

 

 

 

 

Tip the Bottle’s Top picks

2008 Old Block Shiraz

2013 Grenache Shiraz Mourvedre

Grand Tawny

Stocking up

Stocking up

If I don’t speak to you again until Easter, I hope you have a very happy and safe Easter break with some great wine and many chocolate easter eggs.

If you have any fab round trips that you’ve done, please share! I’d love to hear.

 

Until next time winos,

Cheers

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Matching wine with chocolate. Who said it couldn’t be done?

Easter. A day that chocoholics can bask in by eating limitless chocolate, and not be judged. Seeing as though every day is a vino day, what does one do when trying to pair them together at Easter? 5576479777_5ef4e85fa9_zAccording to some people, apparently it’s quite hard to do. ‘Apparently’. When you read the descriptions of wines, there are a lot that state that they have a dark chocolate tasting note. So why can’t a wine with a chocolate tasting note not be matched with a chocolate? I’m not sure of the science behind this, as to why this is the case, but what I can tell you are three little words that will prove these ‘people’ wrong; Nigella Lawson and Port. Okay so technically that’s four words. But who’s counting. You’re currently nursing a sugar overdose.

So let’s start with the first part, getting the chocolate right. I’m sure any chocolate would do, but to ramp it up a bit, I decided to match my wine with a Nigella Lawson dish. I first saw her make this dish on a Christmas special, and was in love with the idea. A chocolate salame. That’s right. It looks like salami, it sounds like salami, but as the name suggests, it’s a chocolate salame. Filled with a selection of nuts, chocolate and biscuit, it’s the perfect combination for an after dinner treat.

IMG_4309To go with this delicious dish, the drink of choice I decided to go with it was a port of course. A port, in my eyes, is a perfect accompaniment to chocolate. While it’s close to red, the sweetness and intensity of a port really does bode well with desserts. I sometimes even skip the dessert and have a glass of port as my dessert. Okay, getting back to the port and dessert matching…my pick is the L.B.V.P from Tahbilk winery. This winery is located close to where I grew up in Nagambie, and is one of Victoria’s oldest wineries, established in 1860. The L.B.V.P is described as “complex nutty, spicy aromas of dark berries & violets and a palate rich with harmonious flavours of chocolate, coffee & walnut finishing with luscious lingering dried fruit sweetness.”

Wow. Even from reading that, it sounds like a chocolate salame in a bottle.

Sure enough, serving the salame along side the L.B.V.P proved to be a hit all around. With a small bite of the chocolate salame, followed by a sip of the port, it really brought out the sweetness and berriness of the port.

Whoever said matching wine with chocolate is hard to do, must not be a chocolate lover. For all you chocolate lovers out there, I can tell you, it can be done. It can be done with a little help from Nigella Lawson and a tasty port.

LINKS:

Nigella’s chocolate salame recipe

Tahbilk’s L.B.V.P

 

Until next time winos,

Happy Easter

Cheers

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