Tag Archives: Rose

Marlborough Wine and Food Festival – a tick off the bucket list

You’ve probably been wondering where I’ve been – is she still drinking wine? did she win Tattslotto and disappear to an island?

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Did she really win tattslotto??

The answer to that is yes, I most certainly have been drinking wine. While I didn’t win Tattslotto, I did disappear to an island…an island called New Zealand.

It happened. After two years in the waiting, I finally attended the Marlborough Wine and Food Festival with my fellow wino friend, who is a massive fan of the Sauvignon Blanc. But not just any Ol Sauvignon Blanc fan, she’s a fan of the Sauvignon Blanc hailing from the Marlborough region.

 

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Ready for some great Savvy B!

Marlborough is THE home of the Sauvignon Blanc, due to producing the most notable wine from this grape. It’s quite a young region, with the grape variety only being introduced to the area in the 1970’s. The first Sauvignon Blanc vines were planted by Montana Wines, now know as Brancott Estate. So what better place to celebrate the Savvy B than at the estate itself, which was where the Marlborough Wine and Food Festival was held.

To get to Brancott Estate we travelled by bus from Blenhim, which was only about a 15 minute trip from the town centre. As soon as we got the the estate, we waited in line and watched the crowds roll in bus after bus. You could feel the excitement building.

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The start of the day. The crowds just got bigger!

As soon as we got in, we scanned the area looking for wineries that we knew, and wineries that we didn’t know, to add to the shortlist of ones to try. The tastings were setup where you could pay $3 for a few sips, or you could outlay $8-$10 for a full glass. This was a no brainer, pour me a full glass please!

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One of the first wineries, Cloudy Bay – Yes, it was a full glass 🙂

Following our first couple of sips (glasses) at Cloudy Bay and Giesen, we wandered over to the wine Masterclass where a Rosé and cheese matching class was about to get underway, with hosts Brian from Mahi wines, and Dan from Kaikoura Cheese.
Grabbing our seats we sat in front of a selection of 7 Rosés from select Marlborough wineries, along with 7 carefully selected cheeses to match. It was really interesting to try something that wasn’t Sauvignon Blanc from the Marlborough region. An enjoyable spread of Rosé’s, which were very much like the classic French Rosé’s from the South of France –  light in colour, strawberry flavours, and a dry finish. Turns out the cool climate for growing this variety of wine is quite similar to the home of Rosé, France.

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The before shot

The clear favourite for me was from Mahi Pinot Noir 2016 Rosé, paired perfectly with a pecorino cheese with fennel pods. The Mahi Pinot Noir 2016 Rosé was a classic Rosé, with a medium to dry finish, with pronounced strawberry notes.

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Brian from Mahi wines! A brilliant winery, and a brilliant wine maker!

Following the Rosé Masterclass, we stumbled back out on to the grassed area to try even MORE wine! With so many wineries showcasing many different wines, here’s a list of the places we tried which were all standouts!

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Roaming water stations. How good is this?! Australia – take note.

In between the sips (glasses) of wine there was also an abundance of food on offer, from pork belly rolls, oysters, through to baked potatoes. I opted for a Brazilian burger. Delish! This provided some much needed energy after many wine tastings.

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Fuel for the Savvy B

As the day went on, the crowd became livelier, the band got louder, and the dance moves became smoother.  Some were even feeling overwhelmed by the sheer number of wineries on site.

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When the day becomes too much a nap is needed!

As the day came to a close, it was time to make way to the busses to get bussed back in to town, where the party continued on at Scotch Wine Bar, in downtown Blenhim.

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The after party location!

So that’s it, I can now finally tick the Marlborough Wine and Food Festival off the bucket list. If you’re planning to make a trip over to the region, I’d recommend planning it around the festival. It will give you a real taste of the region, and will certainly get you in to the spirit of being in the world famous home of the Savvy B!

Until next time winos,
Cheers!

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On the Twenty-Second day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Dominique Portet Fontaine Rosé

With three days out from Christmas, the weather here in Australia is set to soar.

With the working year over (almost over for others), let’s kick back and relax with a Fontaine Rosé, from Dominique Portet.

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This wine hails from the Yarra Valley, a cool climate area in Australia.

The light pink colour is so classic of a Rosé – which is what this wine oozes. Made from Merlot, Shiraz, and Cabernet it’s a slightly peppery wine, with hints of red berries. It’s refreshing and crisp, and leaves you wanting more just like Oliver.

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Please sir, can I have some more Rose?

Hope you enjoy your Thurday with this one!

Until next time winos,

Cheers

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On the Sixteenth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Medhurst Rosé

Yes Tis the season for a Rosé. I’ve now featured a couple of Rosé’s in the advent wine calendar, even a frosé!

It’s on the top of my list as THE Summer wine. It’s a great alternative than just the usual white you may lean towards. It’s even a great wine to take with you when you go sailing! So fancy!

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Look! I’m on a boat!

This Rosé hails from Medhurst Wines in the Yarra Valley in Victoria. It was even crowned best Rosé at the Yarra Valley Wine Show in 2016!

It’s so deserving of the accolade.

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What a winner!

The wine is made from a blend of Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon grapes, and is a beautiful light pink colour. Wondering how Rosé gets its pink colour? see my blog post here!

Melbourne, you are such a tease with your good weather. You make me want to drink Rosé.
It’s crisp and refreshing flavours of strawberry and tarty fruits, like raspberries and citrus, make me feel like I’m eating a dessert, but without the sweetness.

“Deliciously elusive fresh fruits including strawberry and raspberry are supported by white blossom of jasmine and citrus. The 2016 Medhurst Rosé shows bright personality of the Shiraz bringing freshness and liveliness to the wine, and the copper-hue from the Cabernet brings the fine drying finish and amazing persistence of flavour, cleansing the palate ready for another mouthful.” http://www.medhurstwines.com.au

It’s great to have on its own, or with white meat, or even with a cheeky cheese.

Until next time winos

Cheers

 

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On the thirteenth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Frosé

Melbourne is hot hot hot today!
35 degrees : 95 Fahrenheit

To cool off in the summer sun, a Frosé is the perfect way to do it! As the name suggests, it’s a frozen Rosé

It was invented by Bar Primi in New York City. This really is the best thing since sliced bread. What will humans do next?!

How to make it

1. Take a bottle of Rosé and pour in to a tray. Freeze overnight (about 8 hours).
It won’t completely freeze, but will be like a slushie.

I’d recommend going for a darker Rosé. This will make the flavours of the Rosé really come through in the slushie mixture.

My picks –
Tahbilk Cabernet Rosé made from Cabernet Sauvignon
Crittenden Estate’s Pinocchio Rosato made from Sangiovese grapes
6Ft6 Pinot Noir Rosé

In fact, 6Ft6 are straight on the band wagon and you can even order a Frosé pack  to make at home! Check it out here!

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Credit @6Ft6wine

2. While the Rosé is doing its work, time to get on to the strawberry sugar syrup.

Bring 1/2 a cup of water and 1/2 a cup of sugar to the boil. Once the sugar dissolves take it off the heat and pop 220grams of strawberries (almost a punnet) into the pot. Mix, and let the mixture sit for 30 minutes for the strawberries to infuse. Press the mixture through a sieve.

Make sure the sugar syrup is cool before proceeding to the next step.

3. In a blender, scrape the frozen Rosé into the jug, along with approx 100g of the sugar syrup, a squeeze of lemon juice, and 1 cup of crushed ice.

4. Blend blend blend

5. Pop the mixture back in the freezer for 30 minutes

6. Once chilled, pop the mixture back in to the blender and buzz it up again. This will make the icy mixture smoother.

At this stage, if you’re feeling a little frisky, you can even pop in a dash of vodka. (Did she just say that?!)

7. Serve in cocktail glasses and enjoy
Until next time winos

Cheers

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Melbourne, you are such a tease with your good weather. You make me want to drink Rosé.

Oh Melbourne, you are such a tease. First you get an award for being the world’s most liveable city (fourth time in a row), and next, you turn on a perfectly beautiful sunny 17-degree winters day, with more to come! This has got me all excited about spring, which is just around the corner.

For some, spring is a time for frolicking through fields of freshly cut grass, in a spring dress.  For me, it’s more like frolicking through fields of freshly cut grass, in a spring dress, holding a glass of Rosé.

Image credit - LTC Photography

Image credit – LTC Photography

Rosé is the wine for spring (as well as summer): A perfect wine to sip on, when it’s a little too sunny for a red.

Why is Rosé pink?

Rosé is made from red grapes such as Pinot Noir, Syrah, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, Sangiovese, or Grenache. While there are a few ways to make Rosé, the wine essentially gets its colour from the skins when the grapes are soaked or pressed. Once the wine reaches its perfect colour, the skins are then removed.

For me, there are two wines at the top of my list..

AIX Vin De Provence

AIX Rose tip the bottle

Dominique Portet Fontaine

Dominique tip the bottle

How do you take your Rosé?

Typically, Rosé is a dry wine, although there are some slightly sweet varieties out there.  To complement the dryness of the wine, I love to nibble on a few strawberries.

Other ways you can drink it is with any spring-time or summer-time dish such as a salad, fish, bbq meat, or even sunbathing on the grass in a dress – just make sure you’re not lying on freshly cut grass! Grass Stains Ahoy!

As we count down to spring, I’m counting down the days until I can crack out a Rosé at a sunny weekend BBQ.

Until next time winos,

Cheers

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